Projects

Project Name: Orphan Adoption study in Central China

Project Purpose: Set up an easy adoption channel between one Orphan House and the 2 adoption NGOs in Denmark

Project Location: Xiantao City, Hubei Province, China

Project period: 4 stages– each stage lasts 6 months. It starts from August 2013 and ends in July 2015

  • Stage 1 (August 2013-January 2014): Study the regulation in Denmark and Central China. Case studies with families and the adoption agencies in Denmark. Handover report to the next stage.
  • Stage 2 (February 2014-August 2014): Prepare the Orphan House in Xintao and set-up a standard and easy process for adoption from Denmark. Set-up a communication channel.
  • Stage 3 (August 2014-January 2015): Start the first 3 adoption cases with Danish families. Improve the process based on the experience of the 3 cases.
  • Stage 4 (February 2014-August 2014): Establish a stable professional relationship with Danish Agencies.

Requirements to apply: You are studying in or recently graduated from one of the listed programs in an education or research institute:

  • Social work
  • International Development
  • Anthropology
  • Asian Studies
  • Social Entrepreneurship

What we provide for the relocation: 

  • Accommodation to EU standards (shared 2 or 3 bedroom apartments)
  • Bank account assistance
  • Police registration (if applicable)
  • Internet
  • Mobile SIM card purchase and registration
  • Airport pick-up
  • Chinese Language class (if you are interested)
  • Chinese Culture Immerse Program (if you are interested)
  • Organized trip by local partners (subject to availability)

How to finance yourself

  • If you are studying in Nordic Countries, we will provide documents to facilitate your SU application.
  • You can also apply other EU scholarships or raise fund for yourself from family and friend. We provide official documents on your request. To raise fund for yourself, create a page here for your friends and family: http://www.justgiving.com/

Background: Inter-country adoption has always been a long process, in some cases it takes more than 2 years and also long process generally means high cost. Many parents get frustrated by this fact. iGoToChina initiated this project to investigate what is standing in the way of Central China-Denmark adoption and try to facilitate the process.

Here is some more information regarding China-Denmark adoption:

Basic information about intercountry adoptions in Denmark

An adoption must always be considered to be in the best interest of the child. This consideration for the child and its future well-being is continually held as the crucial principle in all adoption activities.

In order to ensure and promote the welfare of the adoptive child, everone who applies for approval to adopt will be examinated by the Danish authorities to prove whether or not an approval can be granted. Furthermore, all applicants who wish to adopt must at least once attend a pre-adoption counselling course.

The procedure regarding the approval of applicants as prospective adoptive parents is described in the paragraph Danish rules on approving prospective parents.

At present moment two private non-profit organisations are accredited by The Danish Ministry of Justice, Department of Family Affairs, to act as adoption placement agencies in intercountry adoption matters.

According to the Danish Adoption Act, intercountry adoption should preferably be performed through these adoption placement agencies. However, if an applicant wishes to adopt a child to whom the applicant is closely related, or for other special reasons, the Danish Ministry of Justice, Department of Family Affairs, can allow the adoption to be performed without the assistance from one of the two accredited bodies.

Denmark has ratified The Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Cooperation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption, and the convention entered into force in Denmark on November 1st, 1997.

It must also be noted that the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child entered into force in Denmark on August 18, 1991.

The Danish National Board of Adoption

The Board was established in 1976 in order to manage complaints regarding decisions passed by the Joint Councils. Since January 1st, 2000, a number of additional tasks have been transferred to the National Adoption Board.

Today, the Board is the central public authority in general charge of adoption in Denmark. As well as being the board of appeal, the duties of the Board are to supervise the work of the Joint Councils and their secretariats, to observe the national and international development in adoption matters, to gather information concerning adoption, to negotiate with authorities and organizations in other countries and to conduct information activities. The National Adoption Board also takes part in the supervision of the two accredited bodies.

Additionally, the Board matches the Danish children available for adoption with the Danish applicants, who have wished to adopt a child born i Denmark.
The National Adoption Board consists of 10 members with diverse professional background.

Address:
The Danish National Board of Adoption
Kristineberg 6
DK-2100 København Ø
Phone: + 45 72 68 80 00
Fax.: + 45 72 68 80 01

Joint Councils

In each Regional State Administration (Denmark is divided in five Regions) a Joint Council is established. The Joint Council is the court of first instance to rule whether or not an applicant can be finally approved as a prospective adoptive parent. Additionally, if the investigation after Phase 1 has raised doubt whether the applicant can be said to fulfil the general conditions to continue the investigation, the Joint Council rules whether or not the applicant is seen fit to continue the approval process. The secretariat of the Joint Council performs the actual investigation, including the interviews with the applicant. Furthermore, the Joint Council decides in particular cases whether or not a specific child can be adopted by an applicant, who is already approved as a prospective adoptive parent, but whose approval is exceeded by various aspects considering the specific child.

A Joint Council consists of three members; a social worker, a lawyer and a physician.

The decisions made by the joint councils can be brought before the National Board of Adoption.

The Danish Ministry of Justice, Department of Family Affairs

The department lays down the Danish rules on approval as a prospective adoptive parent and on the procedures in regard to this matter. The Department is also appointed as the Central Authority according to the Hague Convention.

The Department authorizes the adoption placement agencies, and oversees the agencies’ fulfilment of the conditions in their authorizations.

Finally, the Department arranges the pre-adoption courses as described in the section Danish rules on approving prospective parents.

Address:
The Department of Family Affairs
Kristineberg 6
DK-2100 København Ø
Phone: + 45 72 68 80 00
Fax.: + 45 72 68 80 01

The adoption placement agencies

The following adoption placement agencies are authorized by the Danish Ministry of Justice, Department of Family Affairs, to arrange intercountry adoptions in Denmark:

AC International Child Support
Foundation for International Child Support
Elkjærvej 31
Mailbox 152
8230 Aabyhøj
Phone: + 45 86 12 65 22
Fax.: + 45 86 19 78 53
E-mail: adoption@a-c.dk
Web-site: www.a-c.dk

DanAdopt
Danish Society for International Child Care
Hovedgaden 24
3460 Birkerød
Phone + 45 81 63 33
Fax.: + 45 45 81 74 82
E-mail: mail@danadopt.dk
Web-site: www.danadopt.dk

In order to be approved as a prospective adoptive parent, the applicant must as a general rule register with one of the above mentioned agencies before the Phase 3 of the investigation will commence.

The primary assignment for the adoption placement agency is to establish contact between a Danish prospective adoptive parent and a foreign child, who – according to the rules in the child’s state of origin – is available for intercountry adoption, and to secure that the adoption is carried out in a proper legal and moral manner.

Danish rules on approval as a prospective adoptive parent

Before an approval as a prospective adoptive parent is granted, the secretariat of the Joint Council in the applicant’s Regional State Administration performs a thorough investigation of the applicant. The outcomes of the investigation are presented to the Joint Council, who, based on those outcomes, decides whether or not the applicant can be finally approved as a prospective adoptive parent.

The investigation is divided into three phases:

The first Phase concerns the question whether the applicant fulfils the following general conditions for approval as a prospective parent:

  • The age difference between the applicant and the child should not be more than 40 years.
  • Applicants, who want to adopt a child together must have lived together for at least 2,5 years and must be married.
  • The physical and psychical health conditions of the applicant must not imply a risk that the adoption will not turn out to be in the best interest of the child.
  • The applicants home must be seen fit to house a child.
  • The applicant must show proper economical conditions.
  • The applicant must not keep a criminal record, which implies that the applicant is not fit to be a adoptive parent.

The applicant will continue to the second phase of the investigation, if the Regi-onal State Administrations or the Joint Council decides that the applicant fulfils the general conditions, or if – under specific circumstances – the applicant is granted an exemption from the rules. If the investigation after Phase 1 has raised doubt whether the applicant can be said to fulfil the general conditions to continue the investigation, the Joint Council rules whether or not the applicant is seen fit hereto. If the investigation implies that the applicant undoubtedly fulfils the general conditions to continue the investigation, the Regional State Administration is authorized to make decision hereto.

The second Phase consists of a pre-adoption counselling course, which is mandatory to all applicants, who have not previously completed an intercountry adoption. The aim of the course is to provide the applicants information in concern to different aspects of intercountry adoption, and to establish a basis for the applicants to assess themselves, whether or not they possess the necessary resources to adopt a foreign child.

The third Phase consists of one or more interviews with the Regional State Administration. The purpose of this phase is to investigate if the applicant can be said to posses the individual resources necessary to adopt a child. At the end of the third phase, a home study report about the applicant is put before the Joint Council and the final decision on approval is made.

Decisions on approvals of prospective adoptive parents in Denmark

Approvals The percentage of approvals Refusals The percentage of refusals Decisions in total
1997 830 88 % 117 12 % 947
1998 747 89 % 92 11 % 839
1999 699 86 % 110 14 % 809
2000 607 91 % 61 9 % 668
2001 625 90 % 69 10 % 694
2002 605 91 % 60 9 % 665
2003 529 94 % 35 6 % 564
2004 688 93 % 53 7 % 741
2005 674 92 % 62 8 % 736
2006 665 89 % 83 11 % 748
2007 510 89 % 61 11 % 571
2008 448 84 % 85 16 % 533

Decisions on couples and singles 1997-2008

Decisions on couples The percentage of approved couples Decisions on singles The percentage of approved singles Decisions in total
1997 908 89 % 39 64 % 947
1998 813 90 % 26 46 % 839
1999 770 88 % 39 59 % 809
2000 624 92 % 44 77 % 668
2001 649 91 % 45 71 % 694
2002 607 62 % 58 79 % 665
2003 524 94 % 40 85 % 564
2004 665 93 % 76 93 % 741
2005 658 92 % 78 87 % 736
2006 659 89 % 89 89 % 748
2007 508 90 % 63 84 % 571
2008 478 85 % 55 73 % 533

Received children 1999-2009 

1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
Bolivia 18 22 17 23 14 20 30 22 13 13 6
Brazil 17 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0
Bulgaria 31 22 15 22 10 0 4 1 0 1 1
Burkina Faso 4 0 2 0 4 0 0 0 1 3 3
Colombia 107 114 88 81 58 38 37 36 26 32 32
Croatia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Ecuador 8 6 8 7 7 3 0 0 0 0 0
Estonia 5 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Ethiopia 26 23 22 20 40 41 30 38 39 92 125
Philippines 8 7 5 9 5 5 7 2 6 0 3
Guatemala 2 2 3 1 1 2 4 1 1 0 1
Haiti 9 7 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0
Belarus 0 14 13 25 19 15 0 0 0 0 0
India 132 169 115 93 65 100 65 30 37 16 24
Kenya 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
China 119 129 134 145 178 164 207 157 139 69 89
Korea 71 70 69 46 56 53 46 41 19 25 24
Latvia 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Lithuania 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
Madagascar 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Mali 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3
Mexico 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mozambique 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0
Namibia 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
Nepal 3 2 3 4 1 1 0 0 3 2 0
Nicaragua 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Nigeria 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 6 15
Peru 5 6 5 7 2 3 1 3 3 5 3
Poland 6 5 8 0 1 1 4 0 2 0 0
Romania 10 11 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Russia 9 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Senegal 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Slovakia 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Sri Lanka 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 3 6 5
South Africa 0 0 0 8 13 26 46 43 42 48 78
Taiwan 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3
Thailand 24 24 22 19 10 17 16 16 31 28 22
Czech Republic 7 15 20 19 16 18 13 10 9 8 7
Uganda 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Hungaria 24 14 9 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
United States 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
Usbekistan 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
Vietnam 29 47 62 75 19 13 72 44 51 39 47
In total 697 716  631 609 522 527 586 448 429 395 496